Speech development with your baby

Speech development - If a baby can not speak yet, it does not mean that he can not communicate with you. His eyes, facial expressions and movements often speak volumes. The older he gets, the richer his body language becomes.

Voice development - Body language

Your child turns his head aside: He is tired, or he does not want to eat anymore. When he is older, he throws his head back a bit and closes his eyes. He tries to make clear that he no longer needs contact.

Chalks

Your child will scream if he does not get his way. When he is a little older, he supports his anger with the up and down of his arms and the possibly stamped feet. When your child looks back at you diagonally, he asks if you also come to him to play with him, for example.

Voice development - Spoken language

At birth your baby makes his first sound: crying. Over time, variations occur in the crying sound. At a certain moment you can tell from the kind of howling your child tries to make clear (hunger, angry, pain, tired, etc.). The first form of communication has thus been achieved. After a few months more and more types of sounds are added. He starts combining, vomiting and crowing some vowels and finally babbling a bit. In the beginning there is no logic yet to be discovered, but one day ... you suddenly hear him say 'mum' or 'papa' and your heart glows with pride!

Principles of communication

To be able to talk, a baby must first discover the principles of communication. It must learn to understand what is being said to him and to learn which goal communication has.

Listening is focused attention to a certain sound. Children who pay attention to sound, learn where that sound comes from, what causes it and what it means. Listening plays an important role in the first year of your child.

Create sounds

A child of two months can already be reassured by the sounds of his dad or mom who is approaching to comfort him.
He tries to make his first deliberate sounds when he is about three months old. The first voice sounds of children happen coincidentally. They move tongue, lips, palate and vocal cords and accidentally produce a sound. Once he has it, he will try it extensively.

Keep talking

It is important to keep talking to him in everything you do. Your child will use the sounds to make contact with you and of course he hopes with his sounds that you will talk to him again. He forms more than just simple vowels and consonants and tries to imitate sentences like you who make them by mutually connecting sounds.

Pruttelen

His first sounds are like 'aaaa', 'oooo' and 'eueueue'. After that, gurgling sounds (with saliva in his throat) appear, and bladder and pimple sounds in his mouth. He can blow through his lips, he shows this by blowing bubbles. Your child uses a whole repertoire of sounds and around sixteen weeks he expresses his feelings, often joy, by laughing, reckoning and screaming. Babies like to make someone laugh.

Fantasia words

At some point he will know a number of words and know what this means, but can not yet say it himself. This is called passive language knowledge.
Your child will use more and more different vowels and consonants and combine them into small two-letter fantasy words (ka, ba, le, la, etc). The pronunciation of sounds and words is referred to as the active language knowledge.

Mom or dad

When your child says his dad or mom for the first time, he often does not realize this. He actually only exercises different sounds. For the sense of words, he has to develop a bit further. Around his first birthday he understands small assignments and the sounds he produces are becoming more and more extensive. In addition, he will also practice in pitch, hard and soft.
The letter sounds slowly but surely change into 'babbling' where your child knits together unintelligible and incoherent sentences.

Sound patterns

From about eight, nine or ten months children can listen to sounds and sound patterns. Children start to focus on the sounds that are spoken in the environment and they learn to understand that certain things belong to certain words. Around nine months children start to understand words and short sentences. He will love to point to the object you are asking for. In this period he will also get more interest in booklets. Booklets with simple pictures per page that you can view together. It is important that you tell what you see, accompanied by accompanying sounds or giving a brief explanation. He will find beautiful songs, nursery rhymes and rhymes.

Conscious words

Most children say their first conscious word between the tenth and fourteenth months after their birth. A very small group starts talking for that time and a small group will start later. If your child does not say a recognizable word on his second birthday, it is advisable to contact the health center. Of course it is also possible that your child has a hearing impairment or learning difficulties.

Talk little

He starts to talk a bit with about eleven to twelve months. He can say two or three words with meaning and maybe make a few animal sounds. Maybe he can nod or shake 'yes' and 'no' and get a bit more control over his tongue, mouth and lips and because of that he will drool a little less.

Stimulate language development

Hear to talk, to talk ... It is important that you talk to your child a lot. The more the better. Your child takes over the language through years of intensive listening and endless practice of the voice. The language originates in his brain. He becomes familiar with words and sentences and will gradually discover the meaning. In addition, it also works just very soothing for your child to hear your voice. He already heard you talking when he was still in your stomach. At first it does not matter at all whether your child understands what you are saying, hearing different words and phrases are good enough for him. Vary in the types of sentences and ask him questions in between.

Pauses

Also took a break for his answer. Of course he will not return an answer in the beginning, but in this way your child also learns different tonages in the sentences. If no answer comes back, you can also give an answer for him yourself. It has been found that children of parents who talk with their children learn to talk faster than children of parents who only talk to their children.

To repeat

Your child also makes sounds, make a game of it by repeating his sounds. He will love that you imitate his sounds and it gives him the feeling that you are interested in the sounds he makes. Listen carefully to him and see what he points to. Say it well to check if you have understood him. Do not improve your child. He knows the word he wants to say for a long time, but he needs time to practice. Encourage him precisely because he does his best and reward him if he has mastered a new word.

Simple words

Use in your conversations with your child of simple words and short clear sentences in correct Dutch. If you have a special baby toy (for example, try-out for a car or a quack-quack for a duck), your child will not learn to speak in the right way. You can, however, use different heights in your voice. It has been found that most babies find a high voice more pleasant than a low voice. Just try it out, because there are always exceptions to the rule ...
Sing for your child. Especially between the old-fashioned children's songs are nice short songs with simple melodies. You can also make some nice moves, using your arms and legs.

Reading aloud

Reading aloud also remains a very good way to stimulate language development. You can take your child with you on your lap so that he can watch the pictures right away. With the pictures you can support the words from the booklet so that he can see what you are talking about.

How can you stimulate speech development?

3 months

A number of monthsDevelopmentHow to stimulate?
0 - 3 monthsTo cryKeep talking to him about everything you see and do and do this in short clear sentences
Make all kinds of tongue and lip movementsSpeak clearly and do not swallow words
Laugh when you play with himSing songs for your child or say rhymes
Can kirren of pleasureTry to limit the background noise (prefer to turn off the TV all day) so that your child can concentrate on one type of sound
Makes different sound lettering with vowels and consonants (also non-Dutch)
Can respond to you with sound
He shows his interest in other sounds
Enjoy listening to music

6 months

3 - 6 monthsRecognizes a few words he often hears (mom, dad, day)Keep talking to him about everything you see and do and do this in short clear sentences
Will sometimes stop what he is doing when he hears the word "no".Sing songs for your child or say rhymes
Responds to short questionsTry to limit the background noise (prefer to turn off the TV all day) so that your child can concentrate on one type of sound at a time
Make sound when playingRead together from a picture book
Makes sounds of the mother tongue
Makes grumbling monologues
Repeat syllables

9 months

6 - 9 monthsYour child will scream to attract your attentionKeep talking to him about everything you see and do and do this in short clear sentences
Will stop more often what he is doing when he hears the word 'no'Sing songs for your child or say rhymes and repeat the same songs and / or rhymes often
He babbles with long series of sounds that repeat themselvesTry to limit the background noise (prefer to turn off the TV all day) so that your child can concentrate on one type of sound at a time.
He mimics sounds and the tone of your voiceRead together from a picture book
He now understands small common words like 'no' and 'day'Do his sounds
Tell him what he means

12 months

9 - 12 monthsFirst language awareness, sounds become symbolsKeep talking to him about everything you see and do and do this in short clear sentences
Use of simplified words (allowance)Sing songs for your child and or say rhymes and repeat the same songs and / or rhymes often
Use of changed customers (sape instead of sleeping)Try to limit the background noise (prefer to turn off the TV all day) so that your child can concentrate on one type of sound at a time
May say one to three wordsRead together from a booklet with pictures
Doubling of sounds (ka-ka = jaw)Do his sounds
He will try to sing along with the musicMake playing sounds with the game you play
He will understand the names of a number of people and objectsUse gestures to support your words
He understands his own name
Shakes his head "no"

Video: Childhood Speech and Language Delays

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