Speech development: Your toddler learns to talk

Speech development in your toddler ... How does your toddler talk? How is his development in this?
Language is important. As a result, your toddler can not only talk to others and make certain things clear, he also derives his thinking. In about two years time your crying baby turns into a talking toddler with a vocabulary of an average of 200 words. At three years this will already have been expanded to 1000 words. We are talking about an average here. Every toddler will develop the language at his own pace.

Understandable vocabulary

Long before a toddler starts talking, he has already built up a vocabulary that he understands and stored words and concepts in his little ball. This means that toddlers understand many words and concepts before using them when speaking.

Speech development and language development

For a good language development it is important to talk a lot with your toddler. Read it, make sounds and discuss experiences or explain them. In the beginning the reading out of picture books is very suitable to expose your toddler to the language.
Before your toddler can use the language, he must first understand him. This can only be heard through the language. Also try to sing a lot with your toddler. Toddlers are naturally very fond of music and especially of songs where there is clapping or playing with the fingers.

Answer

Answer your toddler when he says something, even if you do not understand it. Your toddler will find it fantastic to get an answer. Give him enough chance to say something, even if you understand, before he is spoken, what he means, let him finish his sentence.
His first words will often be names of people or objects he often has to deal with.

Girls

Speech development in girls: Girls react more strongly to voices than boys and therefore have a better verbal ability. They also start talking earlier and will make sentences faster. They articulate better and they are also better in grammar. They can also read earlier.

Boys

Speech development in boys: Boys later develop their language skills. They will talk later and do longer to form sentences and read. Stuttering and / or speech impediment are also more common among boys.

12-16 months

Your toddler begins to crack the language code during this period. There is already a huge difference with the baby time in terms of understanding and indicating. He can now understand a number of words and already say a few. He likes to view books with pictures of well-known objects. He will now also understand small projects and maybe even perform them. With about 14 months of age he can say an average of four or five words reasonably coherent.

Names and familiar objects

The first words will usually be names of people and / or familiar objects (food, body parts, toys or clothing).
At 14 to 16 months, the concept of words continues to grow rapidly. He can already understand many names of everyday objects and body parts. At 16 months most toddlers say six or seven words. These words will become increasingly audible between the gibberish. He will also make more and more gestures to make something clear and look at familiar objects when he hears the name, as a sign of recognition. One word can have several meanings. For example, 'mama' can be: 'Mama ... catch', or 'Mama I want to eat', or 'Mama has to carry me', et cetera.

Tips stimulate speech development in toddler 12 - 16 months

Read your toddler often. Name the objects, point to sounds and name colors, patterns and properties.
Start counting.
Take half an hour every day for your toddler to quietly read or play with him.
Talk quietly and clearly while playing.
Say everything in a positive way. If your toddler makes a mistake with a statement, you can praise him and repeat the correct pronunciation.

No comment

Do not comment on the way he says something.
Questions and instructions during reading can be disturbing for listening.
Do not follow in his language, but continue to correctly formulate the sentences (grammatically).
Talk a lot and often. Your toddler often needs to hear the words to learn them and understand the language.

16-20 months

Your toddler is now really developing from baby to self-conscious toddler. There is a clear increase in his comprehension of words and can already recognize many names of everyday objects and follow small phrases. He will now also understand that a pair of pants is a piece of clothing, just like a sweater or jacket. He can respond to simple questions by looking in the right direction.
Your toddler understands the prescriptions long before he can use them.

Around 17 months

Around 17 months there is a rapid increase in the number of words. It will seem that he learns something new every day. At the same time, the ability to include sentences and phrases with two more important words increases. For example: Go to the kitchen and grab your cup.

19-20 months

With 19 to 20 months he will be able to understand his words in a different situation than the environment in which he usually belongs. He also learns to see words separate from objects and people. For example, he now understands the word dad, even if Dad is not there. Now the time has come for him to understand the spoken language a little. He can copy sounds from, for example, a car, animals or sirens. He can repeat short sentences (two or three words) and designate things on request. He can now say a few more words (between 10 and 50) and understand the meaning of you and me.

Tips stimulate speech development in toddler 16 - 20 months

Use as many adjectives as possible (sweet, warm, hard, thick) and connect them with nouns (for example: sweet apple, sweet child, hot water, etc.).
Emphasize verbs and words like 'here' and 'where'.
Point out what words mean as 'up', 'under', 'behind', et cetera.
Use short clear sentences.
Repeat as many new words as possible.
Involve your toddler in various activities and keep talking and naming things.

Reading aloud

Read your toddler often. Name the objects, point to sounds and name colors, patterns and properties.
Take half an hour every day for your toddler to quietly read or play with him.
Talk quietly and clearly while playing.
Say everything in a positive way. If your toddler makes a mistake with a statement, you can praise him and repeat the correct pronunciation.
Do not comment on the way he says something.
Questions and instructions during reading can be disturbing for listening.
Do not follow in his language, but continue to correctly formulate the sentences (grammatically).
Talk a lot and often. Your toddler often needs to hear the words to learn them and understand the language.

20-24 months

The knowledge of words and concepts is now developing rapidly. There is still a difference between the number of words he understands and will use himself. The number of words continues to grow per day. At the beginning of this period he understands about 200 but only uses 10 to 50. Around the second birthday he will say about 200 or more (reasonably) correct. Some toddlers will also link words and use different types of words such as adjectives (fat, sweet, high), adverbs (fast, slow) and personal pronouns.

Longer sentences

He will now also understand longer and more complex sentences. He will also link two or three words to each other and use pronouns, although he will not always do that correctly. Your toddler will talk more with peers. Provide a lot of contact to help develop his language skills. Playgroups can play an important role in this. Also your toddler talks a lot to himself in the beginning while playing. Perhaps he will now also ask more questions like: "What is that?"
Up to two and a half years, your toddler uses the language in many different ways. He can ask questions and answer and express his feelings. He also uses the language to prove his independence (no!)

Tips stimulate speech development in toddlers from 20 - 24 months

Do not give guidance.
Read often, also more complicated stories and use more and more new words.
Use as many adjectives as possible (sweet, warm, hard, thick) and connect them with nouns (for example: sweet apple, sweet child, hot water, etc.).
Find new sounds that make listening fun.
Use sentences with at most three key words while playing.
In addition to words, use the necessary gestures.
Emphasize verbs and words like 'here' and 'where'.
Tell what words mean "up," "under," "behind," and try to point it out or suggest it.
Use short clear sentences.
Repeat as many new words as possible.

Involve your toddler

Involve your toddler in various activities and keep talking and naming things.
Read your toddler often. Name the objects, point to sounds and name colors, patterns and properties.
Take half an hour every day for your toddler to quietly read or play with him.
Talk quietly and clearly while playing.
Say everything in a positive way. If your toddler makes a mistake with a statement, you can praise him and repeat the correct pronunciation.
Do not comment on the way he says something.
Questions and instructions during reading can be disturbing for listening.
Do not follow in his language, but continue to correctly formulate the sentences (grammatically).
Talk a lot and often. Your toddler often needs to hear the words to learn them and understand the language.

Video: Childhood Speech and Language Delays

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