Care leave, rights and obligations

After a hectic morning and a race against the clock, you start your work for your boss exactly on time. And then the telephone rings: the nursery asks if your son can be picked up again. He has 39 degrees fever.

What are your rights and obligations if you unexpectedly, but sometimes also planned, can not carry out your work because you have to take care of a sick child? Do you take your days off, can your employer refuse leave? This is arranged in the 'care leave'. There are various forms of care leave.

Calamity leave

If you have to stop your work abruptly, because you have to take care of a sick child, you can make use of the emergency leave. This leave lasts a maximum of one day. As a rule, you will continue to be paid on this day, unless otherwise agreed in the collective agreement or by the company's Works Council. Your boss can also ask you to take a day off to compensate. To request emergency leave, a phone call to your supervisor must be sufficient.

Short-term care leave

If your child continues to be ill for longer, you can use short-term care leave from the second day. It is regulated by law that employees who have to take care of a sick child living at home can take short-term care leave for this task. 70% of the salary will be paid out over these days, unless otherwise agreed in the collective agreement or by the company's Works Council. Each year you can record a maximum of twice the number of hours you work per week as short-term care leave. The condition is that you are the only person who can take care of your child. The short-term care leave can be requested both verbally and in writing from your employer. In principle, he can only refuse if the company is in serious trouble due to your absence.

Long-term care leave

In the unlikely event that your child becomes seriously ill, you may be able to call on long-term care leave. Each year you can take up half of the number of hours you work per week for a maximum of twelve weeks as long-term care leave. You will not be paid a salary over these days, unless otherwise agreed in the CAO or by the Works Council. The rules for long-term care leave are strict and there really needs to be a life-threatening illness.

Other solutions

A good relationship with your manager is perhaps the most important thing when you want to combine a job and care for children. In addition to the matters that are legally regulated, there is still a choice of other solutions to come up with. Think of the exception of changing working days if you work part-time, work from home or make extra working hours at later times.

Video: Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA): Your Employers Obligations Explained

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